Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year !!!


Brian Wilson - What I Realy Want For Christmas


Dion-Rock 'n' Roll Christmas


Eagles - Please Come Home For Christmas (Single) 



Emerson &Lake and Palmer - I Believe In Father Christmas EP



Jimi Hendrix - Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 


Kenny Rogers & Dolly Parton  - Once upon a Christmas


Petula Clark - Merry Christmas-Joyeux Noel


BEST WISHES FOR ALL !!!
Jancy and Dmitrich

Monday, December 24, 2012

VA - Another Rock'n'Roll Christmas








Merry...Merry .... Merry .... !!!!


Christmas !!!

 








 Merry Christmas Folk  !!!!!


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

****************************





Brenda Lee's Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree includes the festive title track and a mix of classic holiday tunes, including "Winter Wonderland," "Silver Bells," "White Christmas," and "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." Unique Christmas and winter tunes like "Christy Christmas," "A Marshmallow World," "Strawberry Snow," and "I'm Gonna Lasso Santa Claus" round out this happy holiday collection.










JANCY&DMITRICH

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Indfødte lyde / Native Sounds - Denmark Record Labels Vol.10




Indfødte lyde- Native Sounds - Denmark Record-Labels
vol. 10

Shadderhands

01 - Baby
02 - My Money
03 - Down The Road
04 - A Man With A Gun
05 - The End
06 - Let Me Stay
07 - Show Me The Way To Love
08 - Hurting Inside
09 - Any Day You Want It


Shakers

01 - Toreo Twist
02 - My Lucky Day
03 - Petit Fleur
04 - You're The Reason
05 - Right String Baby, But The Wrong Yo Yo
06 - Don't Ask Me What I Say
07 - Keep On Running
08 - Homeward Bound
09 - Daydream
10 - Dedicated Follower Of Fashion
11 - Beautiful Brown Eyes
12 - Sunny Girl
13 - You're So Good To Me



Heimatliche Klaenge vol.140




Heimatliche Klaenge - Deutsche Schallplatten-Labels 
Native Sounds - German Record-Labels

vol.140  VA. - Crying People (VIBRATON VB-6021)



01 - Stay
02 - Crying People
03 - Er kommt zurueck
04 - Wer weiss
05 - Baby I Feel Good
06 - Shame And Scandal In The Family
07 - Unchained My Heart
08 - J' Entends Siffler Le Train
09 - Schoene Worte
10 - Saturday Night
11 - Immer dann
12 - Set Me Free

? who is playing what song ?
Don Adams
Rainer Herpichboehm
Linda Uebelherr (from Silver Convention??)
Pop Drive Ltd.
Monika Maik
Karl Kinzer
Surf Boys
The Earls
Gisela Andrй
Travellers
Angela Huber & The Gentries



Sunday, December 16, 2012

Hickory Wind - Hickory Wind (1969)





The Indiana band Hickory Wind made just one self-titled album in 1969, pressed in a run of 100 copies. The record's a strange, amateurish, yet intermittently tuneful blend of teen pop, garage rock, psychedelia, and country-rock, sung in a fashion that makes it uncertain whether the record was a low-key joke or a naïvely earnest effort to do the best they could. The band later changed its name to B.F. Trike and recorded an unreleased album for RCA in Nashville in the early '70s, though it was eventually issued on a small collector label in the late '80s. This Hickory Wind, by the way, is not the same as the folk group named Hickory Wind that recorded for Flying Fish in the late '70s.


Just 100 copies of this album were pressed originally making it extremely rare.
Like many a late-'60s album pressed in extremely minute quantities, Hickory Wind's self-titled record is a mighty odd bird. It's not so much that any one song is weird. It's more the cumulative effect of the record, in which the band not only don't seem to be seriously pursuing one direction in particular, but don't seem to be particularly serious about pursuing anything. The nonchalant, naive, slightly off-key way they trundle through this mixture of garage rock, country-rock, and melodramatic teen pop almost gives the impression of B-grade session players recruited to record an exploitation album. It's not nearly as bad as that comment might indicate; actually, there's a fair amount of charm that bleeds through, almost in spite of itself. Their vocals and harmonies are engagingly tremulous, the production refreshingly lo-fi. And there are some rather good songs here, particularly the country-rockish "The Loner," which sounds almost like a youthfully naive attempt to emulate early Neil Young (and it's entirely unrelated to the Young tune of the same name); "Country Boy," which comes as close as any song here to being a normal solid late-'60s country/psychedelic rocker; the waltz-like organ swirls of "Father Come with Me"; and "Judy" and "I Don't Believe," which are yearning teen garage pop. This is broken up, though, by the is-this-a-joke-or-what "Mr. Man," a melodramatic recitation that sounds as if the band were trying to make fun of solemn religious devotional records. It's hardly great, but it's worth hearing if you enjoy quirky collisions of garage rock and late-'60s psychedelia.





Saturday, December 15, 2012

The Left Banke - 2 in 1




This New York group pioneered "baroque & roll" in the '60s with its mix of pop/rock and grand, quasi-classical arrangements and melodies. Featuring teenage prodigy Michael Brown as keyboardist and chief songwriter, the group scored two quick hits with "Walk Away Renee" (number five) and "Pretty Ballerina" (number 15). Chamber-like string arrangements, Steve Martin's soaring, near-falsetto lead vocals, and tight harmonies that borrowed from British Invasion bands like the Beatles and the Zombies were also key elements of the Left Banke sound. Though their two hits are their only well-remembered efforts, their debut album (Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina) was a strong, near-classic work that matched the quality of their hit singles in songwriting and production.
the Left Banke's internal dynamic wasn't nearly as harmonious as their sound, and their history goes some way toward explaining their short career. Initially, the group made some recordings that were produced by Brown's father, Harry Lookofsky. When these recordings failed to interest companies in signing the band, the Left Banke broke up, Brown moving to California with the group's original drummer. A backing track for "Walk Away Renee" had already been completed, and the other members overdubbed vocals in Brown's absence. The song was released on Smash and became a hit, and the musicians reunited to tour and continue recording.
Unfortunately, the group, which showed such tremendous promise, was quickly torn asunder by dissension. Due to the nature of their music (which often employed session musicians), the Left Banke's sound was difficult to reproduce on the road, and one could sympathize with Brown's wishes to become a Brian Wilson-like figure, concentrating on writing and recording while the rest of the musicians took to the road. A variety of guitarists, as both session musicians and ostensible group members, flitted in and out of the lineup; Rick Brand, credited as the guitarist on the first LP, actually plays on only one of the album's songs. Adding fuel to the fire, Brown's bandmates wanted to oust Brown's father as the act's manager. In early 1967, Brown went as far as to record a Left Banke single without them, using vocalist Bert Sommer.

That single ("And Suddenly") flopped, and for a brief time in September 1967 the original members were recording together again. After just one single ("Desiree"), though, Brown left for good. Most of the group's second and final album, The Left Banke Too, was recorded without him. While it still sported baroque arrangements and contained some fine moments, Brown's presence was sorely missed, and the record pales in comparison to their debut. Brown went on to form a Left Banke-styled group, Montage, which released a fine and underappreciated album in the late '60s. He later teamed up to form Stories with vocalist Ian Lloyd.
There were some confusing son-of-Left Banke recordings over the next few years, although the band really came to a halt in 1969, after the second album. Brown, Martin, and unknown musicians made a few recordings in late 1969; then, oddly, the original group re-formed for a fine early-1971 single on Buddah ("Love Songs in the Night" b/w "Two by Two"), although the record itself was credited to Steve Martin. And the original group, minus its key visionary Michael Brown, made an album's worth of ill-advised reunion recordings in 1978.

Walk Away Renee Pretty Ballerina 1967



While the rise of folk-rock acts like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful brought 12-string guitars and autoharps into the rock & roll vocabulary, and the Beatles' "Yesterday" and "Eleanor Rigby" opened the door for a more artful use of strings in pop music, the Left Banke pioneered something new with their debut single, 1967's "Walk Away Renee," which incorporated a small string section, harpsichord, and woodwinds to give the song a light yet dramatic Baroque flavor that was unique in rock at the time, and a perfect complement to the song's bittersweet tale of unrequited love. the Left Banke's follow-up, "Pretty Ballerina," was even more striking, and while the group started to fall apart almost as soon as they achieved success, their debut album, named for the two hit singles, was one of the best LPs released in a year full of innovation in pop music. Michael Brown, the group's keyboard player, wrote most of the songs, and with producer and arranger Henry Lookofsky (who was also Brown's father) he helped brainstorm the unusual sound of the Left Banke's material, but vocalist Steve Martin-Caro also played a major role in these sessions; his vocals, which could go from the wistful "Barterers and Their Wives" to the full-on rock shouting of "Lazy Day" at the drop of a hat, are impressive, and he helped write three of the album's best songs, "She May Call You Up Tonight" and "I Haven't Got the Nerve," and "Shadows Breaking Over My Head." Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina is hardly unusual for a rock album of the era in that most of the tracks were dominated by session musicians rather than actual bandmembers, and in many respects, this album was a triumph for the producers and arrangers (among them Steve Jerome and John Abbott, along with Lookofsky) as much as the band, but they also gave this LP a remarkably diverse feel, from the Baroque sound of the hit singles and the formal-dress psychedelia of "Shadows Breaking Over My Head," to the country-rock accents of "What Do You Know," and the straightforward rock of "Lazy Day" and "Evening Down." If the Left Banke's moment of stardom was fleeting, Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina reveals, for a brief and exciting moment, they were one of the best and most innovative American bands in rock & roll.

The Left Banke Too 1968



The Left Banke had been together for less than a year when their debut single, "Walk Away Renee," became a hit, and once the band began touring steadily, they started to fracture as Michael Brown, the group's 17-year-old wunderkind, songwriter, and pianist, decided he didn't care for life on the road. By the time The Left Banke cut their second album, Brown was out of the picture, as was producer and arranger Henry Lookofsky (he was also Brown's dad), and the lineup was down to a trio: vocalist Steve Martin-Caro, guitarist/bassist Tom Finn, and drummer George Cameron. Not promising circumstances for the creation of The Left Banke Too, but surprisingly it's a fine album that shows the group's second string had plenty of talent and a sound creative vision. The album's tone differs from the debut, with fewer songs as mysterious as the lovelorn "Walk Away Renee" and "Pretty Ballerina," and a production that sounds more like intelligent sunshine pop than the leaner Baroque vision of its precursor. But with the help of outside songwriter Tom Feher, the remaining members came up with some impressive material, including the lush psychedelic pop of "There's Gonna Be a Storm" and "My Friend Today," the engaging uptempo rocker "Goodbye Holly," and a witty tale of low-budget rock star decadence, "Bryant Hotel," which features some rollicking piano and a wailing vocal from Cameron. (He and Finn both stepped up for lead vocal spots on the album, with impressive results.) Brown reconciled with his bandmates long enough to write and produce a single, and both sides were included on Left Banke Too, with "Desiree" sounding like a grander variation on the tone of the first LP. The single was a flop, and none of the songs from The Left Banke Too fared any better, but even though it proved the be the band's swan song, it's a great pop album that confirms Michael Brown wasn't the only gifted songwriter in the group. (Two songs on the album feature backing vocals from one Steve Tallarico, who several years later would tie a scarf to his mike stand, change his name to Steven Tyler, and become the lead singer with Aerosmith.)





Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Heimatliche Klaenge vol.138




Heimatliche Klaenge - Deutsche Schallplatten-Labels 
Native Sounds - German Record-Labels

vol.138     The Jay Five

vol.7    45'
01 - Ich komm lieber heut als morgen - Joe & Erik (Cornet 3002)
02 - Und der Regen singt ein Lied
03 - Django (Cornet 3011)
04 - New Sheriff In Silver City
05 - Oh bitte tu das noch einmal - Joe & Erik (Cornet 3026)
06 - Es kommt wie's kommen muss
07 - Katanga (Cornet 3056)
08 - Ode To Billy Joe
09 - So schwarz wie Kaffee (Cornet 3082)
10 - Wo ist mein Weg zu Ende
11 - Arizona (Cornet 3151)
12 - High Is High
13 - What A Way To Die
14 - Early Bird (BASF Cornet 408)
15 - Fat Man
16 - Coca Cola (Marsch Version)
17 - Coca Cola (Soul Version)
18 - Coca Cola (Jay Five Version)
19 - Milch Opera a (Flexi)
20 - Milch Opera b (Flexi)


Heimatliche Klaenge vol.137




Heimatliche Klaenge - Deutsche Schallplatten-Labels 
Native Sounds - German Record-Labels

vol.137     The Jay Five

vol.6    Anytime   Cornet 15024
01 - Anytime
02 - My Angel
03 - I Had My Chance With You
04 - Little Green Man
05 - She's So Funny
06 - Tell Me How You Feel
07 - In The Midnight Hour
08 - Platform-Ticket
09 - The Liar
10 - In My Dreams
11 - Vive L'amour
12 - It's Rainin'



Sunday, December 09, 2012

Donny & Marie Osmond - The Best Of




Marie Osmond 

As part of a family act that came to be virtually synonymous with wholesome entertainment, Marie Osmond enjoyed a lengthy career switching between several different areas of show business. Born Olive Marie Osmond in Ogden, UT, in 1959, she was raised in a strict Mormon family along with her eight brothers. She made her first TV appearance at the age of three, when her oldest brothers performed on The Andy Williams Show as the Osmonds.
After spending the '60s as variety-show fixtures, the Osmonds shot to pop stardom in 1970, and before long the group's management encouraged Marie to try her hand at recording as well. She made several concert appearances with her brothers (though she was never officially a member of the Osmonds), and in 1973 she cut her first single, the country tune "Paper Roses." The song was a gold-selling smash, going to number one on the country charts (the first time a female artist's debut single had ever done so) and into the Top Five on the pop charts. Her accompanying album of the same name also topped the country charts, and Osmond followed it with two more albums for MGM and several more singles, none of which matched its success.
In 1976, she and brother Donny began hosting their own weekly variety show, Donny & Marie, which ran until 1979. In the meantime, she also began to pursue acting; she famously turned down the lead role in Grease because she didn't approve of the script's moral content but found limited success in a series of TV movies and later did voice-over work for several children's cartoons. In the mid-'80s, she returned to country music and signed with Curb, scoring a number one hit right out of the box with the Dan Seals duet "Meet Me in Montana." Her solo follow-up, "There's No Stopping Your Heart," also topped the country charts, and she landed two more big hits in 1986 with the Top Five solo track "Read My Lips" and the number one Paul Davis duet "You're Still New to Me." None of her subsequent singles breached the country Top Ten, though 1987's "I Only Wanted You" came close, and she charted for the final time in 1990 with "Like a Hurricane."

Osmond spent much of the '90s in touring musicals and returned to television in 1998 as co-host of the daytime talk show Donny & Marie, which ran for two seasons. In the early 2000s, Osmond made prominent appearances on the reality television shows Celebrity Duets (as a judge) and Dancing with the Stars. In 2007 she released the seasonal Magic Of Christmas, her first studio album in almost 20 years. It was followed in 2010 by I Can Do This, a collection of spirituals and hymns. Osmond has also written several self-help books, including one dealing with her own bout of postpartum depression.

Donny Osmond


Donny Osmond has been in show business from an age when most children are still becoming accustomed to getting on the school bus in the morning, and in a career that's spanned six decades, he's made a name for himself in nearly every field of contemporary entertainment, most notably music, but also theater, film, radio, and television, and shown that it's possible to grow and mature as a performer while holding on to the wholesome, family-friendly reputation that's always been part of his public persona.
Donald Clark Osmond was born on December 9, 1957; he was the seventh of nine children born to George and Olive Osmond, a devout Mormon couple from Ogden, Utah. George Osmond earned his living selling real estate and insurance, but he loved to sing, and when his sons developed an enthusiasm for music, he helped them form a barbershop quartet. The vocal group began performing regularly in Utah, and they landed an audition to appear on The Lawrence Welk Show. Welk turned the Osmond Brothers down, but while they were in California, George took the boys to Disneyland, and they began harmonizing with a strolling barbershop quartet during their visit. the Osmond Brothers were good enough to attract the attention of park management, and later Walt Disney himself, and were chosen to perform on a television special, Disneyland After Dark, in 1962. That appearance led to a regular spot on The Andy Williams Show, beginning later that same year. In 1963, Donny joined his older brothers Alan, Wayne, Merrill, and Jay in the singing group, and they were regulars on the Williams show until 1969; they were also frequent guests on Jerry Lewis' comedy-variety hour, which ran from 1967 to 1969.
As the Osmond Brothers grew older and the face of popular music continued to change, the boys wanted their act to have a more contemporary appeal, and they retooled themselves as a polished pop/rock combo, with the brothers playing instruments as well as singing. Mike Curb signed the group, now called the Osmonds, to MGM Records, and they went to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to record with producer Rick Hall, whose credits ran the gamut from Wilson Pickett and Etta James to Tommy Row and Paul Anka. Hall's first single with the Osmonds, 1971's "One Bad Apple," became a number one hit, and it was the first in a long string of chart successes for the group. the Osmonds appeared regularly in teen magazines such as 16 and Tiger Beat, thanks to the appeal of their well-crafted records and dynamic live shows, and Donny was often singled out as teen heart-throb material for his well-scrubbed good looks. MGM wasted no time in capitalizing on this, and Donny's first solo single, "Sweet and Innocent," was released in 1971. It rose to number seven on the Billboard pop charts, and the follow-up, "Go Away, Little Girl," went all the way to number one. Donny continued to enjoy solo hits, as well as performing and recording with the Osmonds, who became more ambitious in the recording studio, dipping their toes into harder rock on 1972's Crazy Horses, and crafting a spiritually oriented concept album with 1973's The Plan. In 1973, the lone Osmond sister, Marie, made her recoding debut, scoring a hit single with a cover of "Paper Roses." By the mid-'70s, the Osmonds' popularity was beginning to fade in the notoriously fickle world of teen pop, but in 1976, Donny and his sister Marie became the hosts of a weekly television variety show, with the other Osmond siblings making frequent appearances over the course of the show's run. Donny & Marie was a hit in the ratings, and in 1978, Donny & Marie even starred in a movie, Goin' Coconuts, but viewership began to decline during the third year, and in 1979, midway through its fourth season, the series went off the air.
In the '80s, Donny's career hit a dry spell, particularly after a Broadway revival of George M. Cohen's Little Johnny Jones, with Osmond in the lead, closed after a single performance in 1982. Osmond set out to once again reshape his image into something sleeker and hipper, and he made cameo appearances in Jeff Beck's 1985 music video for "Ambitious," as well as Luis Cardenas' 1986 clip for "Runaway." In 1989, Donny recorded a new album after Peter Gabriel, who met Osmond at a charity event, offered him use of his Real World recording studio in Bath, England. The new album, simply titled Donny Osmond, was a solid, dance-friendly contemporary pop recording, but Osmond's management and record label feared his bubblegum history might work against the album, and they struck upon a novel promotional gimmick. The album's first single, "Soldier of Love," was released to radio as a new song from a "mystery artist," and it gained airplay as listeners wondered whom the singer might be. The gambit worked -- "Soldier of Love" became a major hit, and the album followed it into the upper reaches of the charts.

Osmond released another contemporary pop album, Eyes Don't Lie, in 1990 which, while not as successful as its immediate predecessor, fared well on the charts. In 1992, Osmond returned to the musical stage, starring as Joseph in the Toronto production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; the show was a critical and popular success, with Osmond racking up over 2,000 performances between 1992 and 1997, and in 1999, when Webber created a film version of the musical for television broadcast and home video release, Osmond once again played Joseph in a cast that also included Richard Attenborough and Joan Collins. In 1998, Osmond provided the singing voice of Shang in the Disney animated feature Mulan, and in the fall of the same year, he and his sister Marie returned to television, starring in a daytime talk show that ran until the spring of 2000. Donny also returned to the recording studio to cut a holiday-themed album, Christmas at Home, and in 1999, published an autobiography, Life Is Just What You Make It, in which he openly discussed the ups and downs of his career, the burden of his public image, and his struggle with panic disorder.

In 2001, Osmond released This Is the Moment, an album dominated by songs from Broadway shows, and followed it in 2002 with Somewhere in Time, a collection of love songs which featured a new version of "Puppy Love" (a hit for Donny in 1972), and "No One Has to Be Alone," which Osmond recorded for the animated feature The Land Before Time IX: Journey to Big Water. In 2002, Osmond became the new host of the long-running television game show Pyramid, and in 2004, he returned to pop music with the album What I Meant to Say, his first collection dominated by original material since Eyes Don't Lie; it included the single "Breeze on By," which rose to the Top Ten of the British pop charts. In 2006, Osmond appeared as Gaston in the Broadway production of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, earning enthusiastic reviews, and in 2007, he became a guest commentator on Entertainment Tonight, just in time to cover his sister Marie's stint on the fifth season of Dancing With The Stars, in which she finished in third place. Marie's run on Dancing with the Stars prompted her and Donny to begin performing together again, and in 2008, they launched a revue at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas, while Donny made a surprise return to the big screen in the Martin Lawrence comedy College Road Trip. In the fall of 2009, Donny took his own turn on Dancing with the Stars, and won the grand prize; he followed that up with an eclectic new album, 2010's The Entertainer, which included new interpretations of his earlier hits and pop standards, as well as a handful of new tunes. In 2010, Donny became the host of a syndicated radio show, The Donny Osmond Show, described as "a lifestyle-oriented music radio show," which was broadcast in both the United States and the United Kingdom. And in 2011, Donny & Marie reunited in the recording studio for their first album together since 1978, simply titled Donny & Marie.


20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Donny & Marie Osmond collects a dozen of the brother and sister duo's best-known and definitive performances, including "Leaving It All Up to You," "It Takes Two," "Deep Purple," and "Paper Roses." Though some of the songs the duo tackles venture into rock and disco influences, for the most part their work stayed in the '70s AM pop style that Donny's teenage solo career began with, and is epitomized by songs like "One of These Days" and their version of "Let It Be." Though their sound never quite hit the transcendent highs of the Carpenters' work, at its best Donny & Marie's output had a smooth, airy agreeable quality that has made it date surprisingly well. Not many Osmond retrospectives focus just on Donny & Marie's work, so 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Donny & Marie Osmond fills that gap competently.




VA - Cover Me.Cover The Hits UK








Some time ago I found these records in the web as "unknown album"  without track titles and tags.
Only Back cover with titles song and name artists...
I think this is a private compilation with a very interesting stuff...



Saturday, December 08, 2012

Ola &The Janglers - Surprise Surprise (1965)





Ola & the Janglers were a garage rock and beat group, founded in Stockholm, Sweden in1962. Its lead member was Ola Håkansson.
Among the hits they scored in their native country are "No, No, No" (1965), "Love Was on Your Mind", "Poetry in Motion", "Alex Is the Man" (1966), "I'm Thinking Of You" (1965), "Strolling Along", and "Runaway" (1968). The group's 1969 hit "Let's Dance", a cover of the Chris Montez song, reached #92 on the Billboard Hot 100.


Ola Håkansson, vocal
Christer Idering, guitar. Replaced by Claes af Geijerstam 1965
Johannes Olsson, keyboards (organ)
Lennart Wallin, bass. Replaced by Åke Eldsäter 1966
Leif Johansson, drums

Всё началось в начале 60-х. Малоизвестный молодой исполнитель Ola Håkansson в 1963 году присоединяется к группе The Janglers, как их солист. Ola сразу же занял там лидирующие позиции, так как вскоре название этого коллектива звучало как Ola & The Janglers. Помимо Ola, в группу входили ещё четверо участников, среди которых можно отметить известного шведского музыканта Claes Af Geijerstam (он и являлся автором большинства песен Ola & The Janglers) и Leif Johansson, который впоследствии также попал в группу Secret Service. Творчество Ola & The Janglers было довольно популярным как в самой Швеции, так и за её пределами. Начав репертуар с кавер-версий композиций The Kinks и Rolling Stones, у себя на родине группа записала более 20 синглов. А их песня “Let’s Dance” в мае 1969 года даже удостоилась попасть в American Billboard Top 100. Ola & The Janglers засветились и в роли кинозвёзд: в 1967 году появились два фильма с участием музыкантов: Drra på - Kul grej på väg till Götet и более известный Ola & Julia, где Ola Håkansson даже исполнил главную роль. Саундтрек к Ola & Julia был написан Claes Af Geijerstam, и включал в себя песню Juliet (Julia на шведском), вышедшую также на сингле. Активность Ola & The Janglers стала угасать с началом 70-х. Последние же сингл и альбом группы вышли в 1976-м году с большим отрывом в пять лет от предшествующих релизов. Альбом 1965 года.

01-Surprise, Surprise 
02-Stop Your Sobbing 
03-We Got A Good Thing Going 
04-Land Of 1000 Dances 
05-Love Was On Your Mind 
06-No No No 
07-It`s Allright 
08-Thinkin` Of You 
09-I Remember When I Loved Her 
10-Satisfaction 
11-This Sporting Life 
12-Leave Me Be







Ola &The Janglers - Flashback #20





Ola Håkansson (vocals)
Christer Idering (guitar)
Johnny Lundin (guitar)
Claes "Clabbe" af Geijerstam (guitar)
Johannes Olsson (organ)
Lennart Gudmundsson (bass)
Åke Eldsäter (bass)
Leif Johansson (drums)

Ola and the Janglers bildades 1962. Under några år i mitten och senare delen av sextiotalet hade gruppen sina stora framgångar. En av gruppens största hits, en cover på Chris Montez Let's Dance spelades flitigt inte bara i Sverige. Efter upplösningen av gruppen bildade några av medlemmarna Secret Service.

Ola and the Janglers founded in 1962. For some years in the mid and late sixties, the group had their great success. One of the group's biggest hits, a cover of Chris Montez Let's Dance was played frequently not only in Sweden. After the group disbanded, a few members formed Secret Service.

Ola & The Janglers ‎– Flashback #20 1995
Label: Sonet – 527 418-2

01 Ola & The Janglers - Let's Dance
02 Ola & The Janglers - Hear Me
03 Ola & The Janglers - Save Me, Save Me
04 Ola & The Janglers - I Can't Wait
05 Ola & The Janglers - What I heard Today
06 Ola & The Janglers - You Don't Know Where Your Interest lies
07 Ola & The Janglers - Farewell My love
08 Ola & The Janglers - This Ring
09 Ola & The Janglers - Strolling Along
10 Ola & The Janglers - Juliet
11 Ola & The Janglers - Poetry In Motion
12 Ola & The Janglers - Alex Is The Man
13 Ola & The Janglers - Light Of Lime
14 Ola & The Janglers - Bird's Eye View Of You
15 Ola & The Janglers - Not In My Life
16 Ola & The Janglers - Thinking' Of You
17 Ola & The Janglers - No No No
18 Ola & The Janglers - Love Was on Your Mind
19 Ola & The Janglers - Stop Your Sobbing
20 Ola & The Janglers - Surprise Surprise



The Shaggs - Wink (1967)


REPOST
 



Although recorded in 1967 at the International Recording Studio in Chicago, this one and only offering by the five-piece preppy outfit from Notre Dame University in Indiana, with its multi-part vocal harmonies and jangly guitar, could easily have appeared in 1965 or '66. 
However, there is no doubting the band's musical proficiency as they canter through a selection of songs by such luminaries as the Stones, Who, Beau Brummels, Byrds and Them, with the high point being an inspired version of 'If I Were A Carpenter'. As was so often the case, the band members, after producing what was to become a massively-collectable rarity, went their separate ways, probably to pursue fascinating careers in the world of orthodontistry or accounting.




Holy Ghost Reception Committee #9 - The Torchbearers (1968)




Dennis Blair Guitar, Guitar (Bass), Vocals
Rich Esposito Guitar, Vocals
Elmer Gordon Producer
Bob Kearney Guitar, Vocals
Mark Puleo Guitar, Harmonica, Vocals


Christian psychedelic quintet the Holy Ghost Receptive Committee #9 was the brainchild of Anthony Myers, a teacher at New York City's Regis High School -- assigned circa 1967 to work with students to write and perform contemporary minded songs that could be played at Mass. He assembled guitarists Dennis Blair, Rich Esposito, Bob Kearney and Mark Puleo, along with bassist Larry Johnson. The project proved so successful that Myers landed the group a recording contract with ecumenical publisher Paulist Press, and in 1968 the Holy Ghost Receptive Committee #9 (so named by a fellow student) issued its first LP, Songs for Liturgical Worship. After a 1969 follow-up, The Torchbearers, the group dissolved; Blair later enjoyed a career as a stand-up comic, opening for the legendary George Carlin for over a decade.


"Dennis Blair" (guitar), "Larry Johnson" (bass guitar, organ and rhythm guitar), "Bob Kearney" (guitar),"Rich Esposito" (guitar) and "Mark Puleo" (lead guitar and harmonica) met while attending New York's "Regis Jesuit High School".
Their intentions was to find a way to alleviate the monotony of weekly mass by writing and singing their own songs.
They started writing and playing their own music at daily Catholic masses. 
Somehow convincing Jesuit Anthony Myers and school administrators to support their Rock star visions, they ended up with a recording contract with the Catholic "Paulist Press". 




On The Torchbearers, the band continues in not glossing over life’s difficulties with a “smile, God loves you” kind of approach. In fact the cover photo shows them seated in a vacant trash-filled lot with faceless expressions. The Torchbearers is even heavier than their debut in joining raw garage band enthusiasm with that jangled ‘60s electric Byrds sound. There’s some straightforward Jesus folkrock here such as ‘Walk Across The Waters’ and ‘Rise Up’ (both in a lively classic Byrds style), but they also tackle issues like compassion and poverty (‘Know They’re You’, where clashing garage and fuzz guitars meet up against heavily echoed vocals) and segregation (the garage-rocking ‘Them’s A-Comin’). Nice bass action and fast electric strums on ‘Hey Lord’. Other cuts: ‘You Think Differently’, ‘Magnificat 70’, ‘Jesus H. Clown’ and ‘What Do You Ask Of Me?’. Dedicated to the memory of John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King – the title ballad alludes to them with the words “we’ll take up your fallen cross and fool the world; because the killers really think that they have killed you.” Not afraid to ask some probing questions along the way and include a touch of Ecclesiastes in the lyrics (the back describes their statement as “one crying out for a concerned Christianity”).




The Hellions - Singles (1964-1966)


 

Jim Capaldi drums, lead vocal
Gordon Jackson rhythm guitar, vocal
Dave Mason lead guitar, vocal (joined in 1964)
Dave Meredith bass guitar, vocal
John "Poli" Palmer drums, flute, vibes (joined in 1965)


This talented group was a part of the thriving Worcester beat scene in the early 1960s. Some of the members went on to be involved in the formation of well known and internationally acclaimed bands.

The Hellions were formed in 1963 when Jim Capaldi (born August 2, 1944 in Evesham of Italian parents) who had formerly played drums in a local group called The Sapphires, got together with guitarists Gordon Jackson from a band called Unit Five and Dave Mason who was previously in a local band called The Jaguars.

Dave Mason (born May 10, 1946 in Worcester) was already known locally as a member of The Jaguars, a group that included guitarist Michael Mann and drummer Roger Moss. The Jaguars, heavily influenced by groups such as The Shadows, played mostly instrumental numbers and had taken the initiative to finance the recording of their own limited edition single which they sold at their shows and by word-of-mouth. This "independent" method of recording and distribution is common today but at that time was quite revolutionary.

The early Hellions line-up tried several bass guitarists before Dave Meredith from an Evesham band called The Cherokees was chosen to fill the position. By 1964, the Hellions were becoming well known around Worcester and performed regularly at the Flamingo Coffee Bar.

The Hellions "turned professional" and accepted an engagement at the famous Star Club in Hamburg, Germany in August of 1964 as backing group to Walsall singer Tanya Day who was a minor celebrity at the time after an appearance on Thank Your Lucky Stars. The working conditions at the club were gruelling but the hard work paid off and the band became a much tighter unit due to the long hours of performing. Sharing the same hotel as the Hellions were fellow Midlanders The Spencer Davis Group whose young vocalist Steve Winwood, found much in common musically with Jim Capaldi and Dave Mason.


After returning from Germany, The Hellions soon established a reputation as a musically proficient act and they were hired to provide backing to visiting celebrities such as Adam Faith and Dave Berry. By the end of 1964, the group had made the right connections to secure them a residency at the trendy Whisky-A-Go-Go Club in London where they were seen by visiting American record producer Kim Fowley and songwriter Jackie De Shannon who was at that time writing hits for The Searchers. Jackie was impressed enough by the group to offer them a song to record and helped to arrange a contract for the Hellions with Piccadilly Records, a subsidiary of Pye.

The Hellions first single, entitled Daydreaming Of You, composed by De Shannon, was produced by Kim Fowley, who had previously worked with Birmingham's Rockin' Berries and would later produce the N'Betweens (later to become Slade). The Hellions record was certainly commercial and had an American west coast feel, but neither it or two other underrated singles released by the band in 1965 managed to reach the charts. However, a Hellions composition Shades Of Blue was recorded by lablemates The Rockin' Berries as a track on their first album. Though success in the charts was not forthcoming, The Hellion's work schedule remained busy and they soon went on tour to back the notorious American vocalist P.J. Proby. John "Poli" Palmer joined the band on drums later in the year which allowed Jim Capaldi to front the band as vocalist.

By 1966 with business expenses mounting, The Hellions moved back to Worcester, but the local scene had changed while the group were away in London. Their record company released a final Hellions single entitled Hallelujah but under the group name of "The Revolution" (the band did not find out about this until after the single's release). By this time, Dave Mason had left but undaunted, Jim Capaldi brought guitarist Luther Grosvenor (born 23 December, 1949 in Evesham) formerly from a group called The Wavelengths into the line-up and the band's name was changed to Deep Feeling (see Deep Feeling).


Singles:



Daydreaming Of You/Shades Of Blue (Piccadilly 7N 35213) 1964
Tomorrow Never Comes/Dream Child (Piccadilly 7N 35232) 1965
A Little Lovin'/Think It Over (Piccadilly 7N 35265) 1965
Hallelujah/Shades Of Blue (Piccadilly 7N 35289) 1966 (released as by "The Revolution")

Deep Feeling - Pretty Colours(1968)







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